Symphonies of a storm.

Music is like Weather: No two songs are the same; no two storms are the same.

APPROACH WITH EXTREME CAUTION - This area contains meteorologists and physicists. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED

I'm Kai, and I'm nerdy and I know it.

paulamaf2013:

hayakata:

kropotkindersurprise:

Two ways of dealing with tear gas grenades from comrades in Turkey: Either submerge them in water. Make sure you can close off the container cause the gas will still spread for a while. Or throw them in the fire so the gas burns off before it can spread.

Wow.

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST

(via falris)

stephank:

This is an article worthy of the NY Post, apparently. (Article)
If you REALLY need to see the article, it’s right up there, but I’d recommend not giving them the pagehits if you can avoid it. That would just give them more reason to write articles like this.
This is the gist: “I like getting catcalled, and actively seek out that kind of attention. Don’t judge me!”And she shouldn’t be judged for liking attention and being upfront about it, that’s her prerogative. Let’s be real, most people like to get attention in some form or another. But she’s saying that because she enjoys being catcalled, every other woman in the world who doesn’t like it should just shut up and take it. That’s kinda messed up. More than “kinda,” in fact.
To be clear; I’m not a woman. I’m a straight white dude, basically a supervillain on some parts of Tumblr. However, it’s still important to me that people get treated with a base amount of respect, and that means treating people in a way they’re comfortable being treated. Becoming an object for men to hoot and holler at is something many women have been outspoken about not enjoying. In fact, it makes many women feel unsafe. Telling them to “deal with it” is wrong.
Any ladies wanna chime in on how they feel about this?
(P.S. Please avoid any Tumblr-isms like wishing death or worse on the author.)

stephank:

This is an article worthy of the NY Post, apparently. (Article)

If you REALLY need to see the article, it’s right up there, but I’d recommend not giving them the pagehits if you can avoid it. That would just give them more reason to write articles like this.

This is the gist: “I like getting catcalled, and actively seek out that kind of attention. Don’t judge me!”

And she shouldn’t be judged for liking attention and being upfront about it, that’s her prerogative. Let’s be real, most people like to get attention in some form or another. But she’s saying that because she enjoys being catcalled, every other woman in the world who doesn’t like it should just shut up and take it. That’s kinda messed up. More than “kinda,” in fact.

To be clear; I’m not a woman. I’m a straight white dude, basically a supervillain on some parts of Tumblr. However, it’s still important to me that people get treated with a base amount of respect, and that means treating people in a way they’re comfortable being treated. Becoming an object for men to hoot and holler at is something many women have been outspoken about not enjoying. In fact, it makes many women feel unsafe. Telling them to “deal with it” is wrong.

Any ladies wanna chime in on how they feel about this?

(P.S. Please avoid any Tumblr-isms like wishing death or worse on the author.)

(via kaiserneko)

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.
You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.
This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.
Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.
Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.
Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.
It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.
If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue. 
Sign the petition, then spread the word.

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.

You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.

This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.

Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.

Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.

Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.

It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.

If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue.

Sign the petition, then spread the word.

(via fishingboatproceeds)

socialjusticekoolaid:

Love “Da Man Wit the Chips” but Jameila White is the new “Protest MVP.” #staywoke #trill 

(via avatarbassoons)

babefield:

mercurialgurl:

redtemplo:

BUSTED! Gov. Running #Ferguson Twitter Psyop

GOD!

LOOK

JESUS

(via gimtana)

eretzyisrael:

Ain’t it true.

eretzyisrael:

Ain’t it true.

(via avatarbassoons)

(Source: mattbors.com, via cartoonpolitics)

thunduros:

fashionablecrocs:

so lately ive been really obsessed with political cartoons for some reason

BUT LOOK AT THESEimage

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

IT IS AMAZING HOW SOMETHING SO SIMPLE CAN HOLD SO MUCH MEANING AND TRUTH

wow

(via paragonpostcards)